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April 14, 2015 | 0 comments

When 911 dispatchers get a call that someone has collapsed and stopped breathing, they quickly notify first responders. In hundreds of communities across the U.S., they now also send out a smartphone app alert summoning citizens trained in CPR. If those Good Samaritans arrive at the scene first, they can start resuscitation efforts until the professionals get there: http://www.emergencymgmt.com/health/Rescue-Workers-Use-Apps-Help-Save-Li...

April 14, 2015 | 0 comments

Smartphones and other personal electronic devices could, in regions where they are in widespread use, function as early warning systems for large earthquakes according to newly reported research. This technology could serve regions of the world that cannot afford higher quality, but more expensive, conventional earthquake early warning systems, or could contribute to those systems. The researchers found that the sensors in smartphones and similar devices could be used to issue earthquake warnings for earthquakes of approximately magnitude 7 or larger, but not for smaller, yet potentially damaging earthquakes: http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20150414-smartphones-could-be-...

April 7, 2015 | 0 comments

Digital Humanitarians sprung to action just hours after the Category 5 Cyclone collided with Vanuatu’s many islands. This first deployment focused on rapidly assessing the damage by analyzing multimedia content posted on social media and in the mainstream news. This request came directly from the United Nations (OCHA), which activated the Digital Humanitarian Network (DHN) to carry out the rapid damage assessment. So the Standby Task Force (SBTF), a founding member of the DHN, used QCRI′s MicroMappers platform to produce a digital, interactive Crisis Map of some 1,000+ geo-tagged pictures of disaster damage (screenshot below): http://irevolution.net/2015/04/07/digital-jedis-cyclone-pam/

April 7, 2015 | 0 comments

A year after the recent Ebola outbreak was first reported, the federal government is assessing how experimental technology -- wrist-worn devices that automatically monitor patients’ vital signs, for instance -- could help contain it or a future health crisis. As the outbreak continues in parts of Western Africa, the U.S. Agency for International Development and other agencies are still investing and prototyping new devices, often looking to the private sector and the general public for ideas. Federally-funded research projects include wearable monitors and new personal protection equipment suits, among others. At a April 2, 2015 event hosted by USAID and the White House Office of Science and Technology and Policy, agency representatives discussed how collaboration and crowdsourcing could advance health-related technology: http://www.nextgov.com/emerging-tech/2015/04/limits-technology-fighting-...

April 1, 2015 | 0 comments

 

 

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