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November 12, 2013 | 0 comments

It will be months before we know the true damage brought about by super typhoon Haiyan. The largest death tolls now associated with the storm are only estimates. Aid workers from across the world are now flying to the island nation, or they just recently arrived there. They—and Filipinos—will support survivors and start to rebuild. But they will be helped by an incredible piece of technology, a worldwide, crowd-sourced humanitarian collaboration made possible by the Internet. What is it? It’s a highly detailed map of the areas affected by super typhoon Haiyan, and it mostly didn’t exist three days ago, when the storm made landfall. Since Saturday, more than 400 volunteers have made nearly three quarters of a million additions to a free, online map of areas in and around the Philippines. Those additions reflect the land before the storm, but they will help Red Cross workers and volunteers make critical decisions after it about where to send food, water, and supplies. These things are easy to hyperbolize, but in the Philippines, now, it is highly likely that free mapping data and software—and the community that support them—will save lives:
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/11/how-online-mapmake...

November 12, 2013 | 0 comments

The US military is already helping the storm-ravaged Philippines, a long-time ally. The Chinese military not only isn’t responding, it can’t respond — not with anything like the speed or scale that the US can achieve thanks to our global fleet of airborne tankers, cargo planes (like the KC-130Js pictured above), large-capacity naval vessels, friendly seaports such as Singapore, and Pacific land bases. What’s more, the Philippine government probably wouldn’t want help from the Chinese even if they could get there. Those facts represent a major US advantage not only in this one incident in the Philippines but in the long-term struggle for influence across the Western Pacific. On Saturday November 9, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced he had ordered Pacific Command (PACOM) to assist the Filipinos. In fact, the Pentagon’s chief spokesman, George Little, had already made clear to the media the US stood ready to help in a statement Saturday, and PACOM was probably planning well before. In fact, the US military has been carrying out disaster response operations around the region for years, with the Boxing Day Tsunami the best and most impressive example: http://breakingdefense.com/2013/11/philippine-typhoon-showcases-us-strat...

November 12, 2013 | 0 comments

he number of Marines and sailors deployed to assist with the humanitarian crisis in the Philippines tripled to 270 following Friday’s Super Typhoon Haiyan, which officials now believe killed 10,000 or more people and left hundreds of thousands homeless. About 180 Marines and sailors left Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Japan, on Monday, for the Philippines aboard four MV-22B Ospreys and three KC-130J Hercules, according to a Marine Corps news release. The Ospreys are assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262 and the KC-130Js are with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152. They will assist the forward command element and humanitarian assistance survey team, the release states. Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy, the deputy commander of III Marine Expeditionary Force and the commanding general of the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, is overseeing the relief efforts: http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/article/20131111/NEWS08/311110023/More-M...

November 12, 2013 | 0 comments

New York Times has prepared a map showcasing the worst destruction in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/11/11/world/asia/typhoon-haiyan-...

November 11, 2013 | 0 comments

The Center for Technology and National Security Policy (CTNSP) is the research center within the National Defense University that houses the TIDES Team.  Check out their website for the latest articles and publications! http://ctnsp.dodlive.mil/