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November 8, 2013 | 0 comments

This time last year, Hurricane Sandy was finishing up a one-week tour that consisted of killing (at least) 286 people and causing an estimated $68 billion in damage, making it the second most costly hurricane in U.S. history. On Oct. 24, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced $162 million in funding that will be distributed among 45 restoration and research projects aimed at protecting the Atlantic coast from future storms. The projects selected for funding were chosen based partially on the work of a new organization called the Strategic Sciences Group (SSG). Formally established in January 2012, the SSG is a small, adaptable group of scientists charged with visiting live disaster sites like Hurricane Sandy or the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and providing decision-makers with information that allows them to make better long-term strategic choices, such as deciding which research projects will be most helpful when the next storm comes: http://www.emergencymgmt.com/disaster/Science-During-Crisis.html

November 8, 2013 | 0 comments

With 3.575 million people dying each year from water-related disease, our current water crisis is one of epic proportions. At any given time, half of the world’s hospital beds are occupied by those suffering from illness brought on by limited access to safe drinking water, poor hygiene and sanitation. Granted these harrowing realities plaguing our society, it’s imperative that designers, inventors, engineers and visionaries do what they can to find a solution. Fortunately, there’s no shortage of innovation on tap – read on for six water purifying designs for the developing world:
http://inhabitat.com/6-water-purifying-devices-for-clean-drinking-water-...

November 7, 2013 | 0 comments

ALEXANDRIA, Virginia — Africa “is the center of gravity for security sector reform,” has surpassed many other parts of the globe in tackling difficult defense reforms, and “has led the world in developing an understanding of security that transcends traditional military and defense institutions,” says Professor Thomas Dempsey, a retired U.S. Army colonel who is Chair of Security Studies at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS). Addressing nearly 60 African leaders from 40 different countries at the Next Generation of African Security Sector Leaders program on October 25, 2013, Prof. Dempsey spoke about the process of security sector reform in Africa. The presentation was followed by questions and discussion by participants on the issue and how they have experienced this reform in their own countries.
See more at: http://africacenter.org/2013/10/africa-on-cutting-edge-of-security-secto...

November 5, 2013 | 0 comments

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) employs more than 240,000 people in a variety of areas and activities, from border security and aviation to emergency response and cybersecurity, plus everything in between. Many may not be aware of the fact that DHS has also been busy developing some cool, high-tech, life-saving gear to protect people before, during, and following disasters and emergencies: http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20131105-cool-technology-from-dhs

November 5, 2013 | 0 comments

Great civilizations have fallen because they failed to prevent the degradation of the soils on which they were founded. The modern world could suffer the same fate. A new study describes how the productivity of many lands has been dramatically reduced as a result of soil erosion, accumulation of salinity, and nutrient depletion:
http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20131105-planet-s-arable-land-...