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October 22, 2013 | 0 comments

Connected to the rest of the world by bridges and tunnels, stores in the New York Citry have been rendered stockless during numerous blackouts, storms and other emergencies when trucks simply couldn’t get into the city. The Atlantic recently shed light on this known danger and how it could be rectified with the introduction of more local food production:
http://www.theatlanticcities.com/politics/2013/10/new-yorks-looming-food...

October 17, 2013 | 0 comments

A team from the University of Cambridge is attempting to mimic a natural process perfected over billions of years to create ‘green transport fuel’. The team is capturing solar energy through artificial photosynthetic systems and combining it with water and air to brew up the next generation of clean gasoline. Using solar energy to separate the elements that make up water and carbon dioxide (CO2), the Cambridge team is able to create synthetic gas, or syngas, which consists of energy-rich hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gas combination is then converted into liquid hydrocarbons such as petroleum through an established industrial process. “Syngas has been made successfully at an industrial level for decades by the petrochemical industry for the production of pharmaceuticals, plastics and fertilisers,” explained Reisner, who leads the Christian Doppler Laboratory in the Department of Chemistry, “but it requires fossil fuels to make syngas, thereby depleting our natural reserves and producing the greenhouse gas CO2 as a by-product. It’s therefore neither renewable nor clean. The process we are developing is sustainable because it uses sunlight-driven water splitting and takes carbon from the atmosphere only to return it when the syngas is used for the release of energy.” More at http://inhabitat.com/cambridge-scientists-are-brewing-green-gasoline-fro...

October 17, 2013 | 0 comments

A group of researchers at the University of Hawaii has done the math to figure out exactly how soon different world cities can expect to feel major changes in their average climate. The earliest effects are going to be seen in Manokwari, the capitol of West Papua, Indonesia. Temperatures are going to start rising in a major way in just a few short years, in 2020. Jakarta and Lago aren’t far behind. Mexico City will feel the heat next in 2031, followed by Bogota, Cairo, Bagdad, and Nairobi in 2036. Major changes won’t come to the US until the 2040s, with increased temperatures in New York and San Francisco. Other major world cities like Rome, Tokyo, and Beijing will also start to shift at about the same time: http://inhabitat.com/researchers-predict-when-earths-major-cities-will-f...

October 16, 2013 | 0 comments

Successes at the 7th Annual TIDES Technology Demonstration included - please see pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nduaudiovisual/sets/72157636394804793/

• Over 700 attendees from the military, academia, NGOs, private companies, and interested citizens attended despite exhibiting during a government shutdown.
• Speakers from the military, US Government, NGOs, and private sector including Honorable Dennis McGinn, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installations, and Environment shared their insights.
• Showed operational capabilities:
100% of the demonstration powered by four exhibitors with portable solar equipment.
Filtered drinking water provided by two exhibitors for all attendees.
All lunchtime food, coffee and tea provided by five exhibitors was cooked in solar ovens and high efficiency stoves .
Six satellite networks operated, independent of power grid.
Loudspeaker provided for all announcements by one exhibitor independent of power grid.
Seven exhibitors provided multiple options for shelter.
• Continued development of a strong network of public-private, whole-of-government, transnational relationships. Our members formed and strengthened invaluable partnerships within the network.

October 16, 2013 | 0 comments

A recent forum hosted by the Reserve Officers Association in Washington addressed the use of drones in peace and stability operations. Attendees noted the possibility of expanded roles for these systems is growing rapidly, which also raises a number of questions: How are they going to be maintained? What happens to the data they collect? Where can they fly and under what conditions? Four times a year inventors, NGOs and others in the UAV industry gather at Camp Roberts, a National Guard post in central California, to test their products in rugged field conditions. It allows them to work “through their problems, and we talk to each other,” said Sam Bendett, who works on unmanned aerial systems research and development at NDU. “It’s a safe place to fail,” he added, noting that those who come to the exercises understand that it’s “better to be broken there than when you’re deploying.”
More at http://www.nextgov.com/emerging-tech/2013/10/commentary-drones-arent-jus...