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September 19, 2013 | 0 comments

As the situation in Syria continues to deteriorate, could the humanitarian crisis afflicting the country and its neighbors provide an entryway for regional cooperation? This policy paper examines how regional responses to humanitarian crises have succeeded or failed to meet humanitarian objectives in order to inform approaches to contemporary crises. It also assesses whether such regional responses contributed to strengthening regional integration and cooperation, paving the way for increased regional stability and an improved capacity to respond to emergencies:
http://www.ipinst.org/publication/policy-papers/detail/409-cooperation-f...

The report explores two different humanitarian crises: the war in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s and Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar in 2008. Examining the ways in which countries in each region and regional organizations addressed humanitarian needs, it draws a number of lessons that could be applied in contemporary crises:

Regional ownership over the response is crucial, but not necessarily spontaneous. External actors can usefully contribute through a balanced mix of pressure and technical support....

September 19, 2013 | 0 comments

On September 16, Dr. Linton Wells and Sam Bendett from TIDES spoke at the Reserve Officers Association in DC about the use of UAVs for humanitarian purposes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMr0mw4b9Tg&feature=c4-overview&list=UUgS...

September 19, 2013 | 0 comments

It doesn’t take a person entering the field of emergency management long to figure out that when it comes to responding to and recovering from disasters, we don’t have much, if any, authority. This then is our lot in life. Lots of responsibility, no authority. How then do you successfully lead without authority? Here’s how you can lead, but not command.
More at http://www.emergencymgmt.com/training/Lead-Without-Authority-Opinion.html

September 19, 2013 | 0 comments

The price of an early warning system which would alert California officials about an earthquake within sixty seconds before a major temblor strikes would be$80 million. The California legislature passed a bill on 13 September, requiring the state to develop the earthquake warning system. “We live in earthquake country. When it comes to earthquakes in California, it is not a matter of if, but when,” State Senator Alex Padilla, the bill’s lead sponsor, said in a statement. “A fully developed earthquake early warning system will provide Californians critical seconds to take cover, assist loved ones, or pull over safely to the side of the road. It could allow time to stop a train and power down critical infrastructure. Most importantly, it will save lives.”
More at http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20130919-california-mulls-cost...

September 19, 2013 | 0 comments

The Federal Aviation Administration currently doesn’t allow drones to fly over cornfields searching for patches of blight, but likely will soon — sparking an industry that’s predicted to generate more than $82.1 billion within the first decade. Farmers and ag enthusiasts on Tuesday September 17 at the annual Farm Science Review in Madison County were given a firsthand look at drones in flight and were told of the services unmanned aircraft might soon be able to offer them. More at http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/news/news/local/drones-flying-high-at-...